When you are caring for a loved one there are many questions you will have along the way.  The Gathering Place has compiled a list of resources to help answer your questions about care and illnesses.

What is Elder Abuse?

In general, elder abuse refers to intentional or neglectful acts by a caregiver or “trusted” individual that lead to, or may lead to, harm of a vulnerable elder. In
many states, younger adults with disabilities may qualify for the same services and protections. Physical abuse; neglect; emotional or psychological abuse; financial abuse and exploitation; sexual abuse; and abandonment are considered forms of elder abuse. In many states, self-neglect is also considered mistreatment.

Who is at Risk?

Elder abuse can occur anywhere – in the home, in nursing homes, or other institutions. It affects seniors across all socio-economic groups, cultures, and races. Based on available information, women and “older” elders are= more likely to be victimized. Dementia is a significant risk= factor. Mental health and substance abuse issues – of both abusers and victims – are risk factors. Isolation can also contribute to risk.

Red Flags of Abuse

Does someone you know—a senior or adult with a disability—display any warning signs of mistreatment?

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Elder abuse is a serious problem. In general, elder abuse refers to intentional or neglectful acts that lead to, or may lead to, harm of a vulnerable older adult. Physical abuse; neglect; emotional or psychological abuse; verbal abuse and threats; financial abuse and exploitation; sexual abuse; and abandonment are considered forms of elder abuse. In many states, self‐neglect is also considered mistreatment.

Elder Abuse Prevention Programs are available around the country to investigate and intervene when allegations of abuse are reported.

How do I report elder abuse or abuse of an older person or senior?

Call the police or 9-1-1 immediately if someone you know is in immediate, life-threatening danger.

If the danger is not immediate, but you suspect that abuse has occurred or is occurring, please tell someone. Relay your concerns to the local adult protective services, long-term care ombudsman, or the police.

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August 6, 2018

The Wall Street Journal (8/6, Ansberry, Subscription Publication) reports that as the US ages, caregivers are increasingly becoming younger, with Millennials comprising 24 percent of the nation’s unpaid caregivers, an increase from 22 percent in 2009, according to the National Alliance for Caregiving. The Journal cites experts who explain that Millennial caregivers often are strained by their responsibilities and may postpone events such as advancing in careers, and even sustain financial strain. About one-third of Millennial caregivers has an average household income of less than $30,000, and most work full-time while dedicating an average 21 hours per week to caregiving.

Full article at Wall Street Journal (8/6, Ansberry, Subscription Publication)

reprinted with permission from www.acl.gov

Getting older does not necessarily mean a person's driving days are over. But it’s important to plan ahead and take steps to ensure the safety of your loved ones on the road. Learn more about how to recognize and discuss changes in your older loved one's driving.

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Holidays can be meaningful, enriching times for both the person with Alzheimer’s disease and his or her family. Maintaining or adapting family rituals and traditions helps all family members feel a sense of belonging and family identity. For a person with Alzheimer’s, this link with a familiar past is reassuring.

However, when celebrations, special events, or holidays include many people, this can cause confusion and anxiety for a person with Alzheimer’s. He or she may find some situations easier and more pleasurable than others. The tips below can help you and the person with Alzheimer’s visit and reconnect with family, friends, and neighbors during holidays.

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